Sedis Game Instructions

SEDIS A Timeless Game System for All Ages

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Download Print and Play Sedis Tiles

Sedis is more than just a game; it is a universal gaming device with which you can play many games. The sample games found here and elsewhere are an introduction to some of the many game mechanics Sedis provides. You are highly encouraged to create new games with Sedis and share these with others.

 

Sedis Instructions

  • Sedis consists of 60 six-sided tiles. Each side of a tile has five circles, some filled in (pips) and some not (blanks). One side has three pips; this is often called the primary side. It is sometimes useful to number the positions of the circles on a side of a tile. The easiest way to do this is to imagine that the side is facing ‘upward’ and number the spaces from 1 to 5, reading left to right. Details on how Sedis tiles are designed may be useful to some players and game creators. These details, though, are not necessary to play and have fun with Sedis tiles! Read more about the details of the how to read a Sedis tile in our blog. 

  • The primary side (the three pip side) of each tile determines where the pips on the other five sides of that tile can be located. Two sides of each Sedis tile have two pips and three sides have one pip. For example, if a tile’s primary side has pips in the first, second, and third position, then pips on the other five sides can only appear in the first, second, or third positions; there will only be blanks in the fourth and fifth positions on all sides of that tile. The set of pips on the primary side of a tile determines the family to which the tile belongs to. A full Sedis set is made up of ten families and there are six tiles per family.

    The primary side is at the 12 o’clock position here, with three pips in the first, second and third position

    The primary side determines the possible one pip sides

    The combination of single pip sides determine the possible two pip sides

  • Game Mechanics

    The unique qualities of Sedis allow you to create your own games. Some mechanics have already been discovered:

    • Aligning Tiles
    • Matching Pips and/or Blanks
    • Using the Ten Families
    • Comparing Number of Pips of Adjacent Tiles
    • Stacking Tiles
    • Jumping over Tiles
    • Rotating Tiles
    • Flipping Tiles
    • Interpreting Pips

      As Numbers

       


      As Morse Code

      As Movement

       

  • Honeycomb

    The Original Sedis Game

    Recommended # of Players: 1 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: 30 minutes to an hour
    Objective: score the most points
    Difficulty Level: •◦◦◦◦

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. One player draws a number of tiles equal to the number of players, places them on the playing table, face-down, so that each tile is touching at least one other tile. Then, this player flips the tiles over. This is the starting set of tiles.
    3. Each player then draws five face down tiles to form their hand. The remaining tiles form a draw pile. After this is done, play begins.
      Note: No scoring occurs during setup. It may be helpful to use a pen and paper for scoring during play.

    Example of Honeycomb four player setup

     

    Example of Honeycomb three player setup

    Play

    1. Choose a player to go first. Players take turns clockwise.
    2. Each player takes a tile from their hand and connects one side of the tile to another side of at least one previously placed tile. Each placed tile can touch one or more tiles. Players receive a point for every pip that matches with a pip of the tile(s) adjacent to it.
    3. At the end of each turn, the player draws a face down tile back into their hand.
    4. After all face down tiles have been drawn, continue play until there are no tiles left in anyone’s hands.
    5. The player with the most points wins!

    3 Matching Pips = 3 Points

     

    Honeycomb Short Game

    Setup: Shuffle all tiles. Each player draws five tiles into a closed hand. Draw more tiles equal to the number of players and place them in the center of the table, face down and adjacent, in whatever orientation the players choose. Then, flip them over.
    Play: Each player, in turn, plays one tile from their hand adjacent to any tiles already in play. Once played, count the pips from the played tile that match with the pips on the adjacent table tiles. Add this to the player’s total score. Do not draw any additional, use only originally drawn tiles.
    Win: The player with the most points wins!

    Solo Variant: Compete against yourself for higher and higher scores!

  • Reach for the Sky

    Dimensional Honeycomb

    Recommended # of Players: 1 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: 30 minutes to an hour
    Difficulty Level: ◦•◦◦◦
    Objective: Score the most points.

    Setup 
    NOTE: Setup for Reach for the Sky is the same as setup for Honeycomb.

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. One player draws a number of tiles equal to the number of players, places them on the playing table, face-down, so that each tile is touching at least one other tile. Then, this player flips the tiles over. This is the starting set of tiles.
    3. Each player then draws five face down tiles to form their hand. The remaining tiles form a draw pile. After this is done, play begins. From here on out, each placed tile may touch one or more previously placed tiles.

    Play

    1. Players take turns clockwise. Reach for the Sky is very similar to Honeycomb, but players can move two different ways:
      -Players can take a tile from their hand and connect one full side of that tile to at least one other full side of any previously placed tile; or
      -If a tile is touching three or more other previously placed tiles, players can stack a tile directly on top of it.
      Each placed tile can touch one or more tiles.

    2. Players receive a point for every pip that aligns between the side(s) of the tile they place and the side(s) of the tiles adjacent to it:

    3. Players must maintain five tiles in their hand until there are not enough tiles to do so; after a player makes a move, they draw another upside down tile and add it to their hand.
    4. Players continue taking turns until all tiles have been used. After all face down tiles have been played, continue playing until there are no tiles left in anyone’s hands.
    5. The player with the most points wins!
  • Rings

    Run Rings around the Table

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: 45 minutes to an hour
    Objective: complete the most rings
    Difficulty Level: ◦•◦◦◦

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. Each player draws three face down tiles to form their hand. The remaining tiles form a draw pile.
    3. The first player takes one tile from the draw pile and places it face up on the playing surface.
    4. Moving clockwise, have each player take a tile from the draw pile and connect them by matching up tiles along single pip sides. Pips must match exactly. If a player’s tile cannot be matched, discard it and draw another until pips can be matched.
    5. The game begins once all players have added a single tile.
      Note: No scoring occurs during setup.

    An example of Rings setup with three players

    Play:

    1. Players take turns by placing a tile from their hand next to a played tile so that the connected pips on single pip sides match each other exactly.
    2. After each player plays a tile from their hand, they draw another tile from the draw pile. Play continues clockwise.
    3. When a player completes a ring of tiles, they score one point. Be sure that when completing a ring the pips on all single pip sides of the tile being played match exactly with the pips on the previously placed tiles.
      Note: It is possible to complete more than one ring in a single play.

      Each Completed Ring = 1 Point

       

    4. If a player cannot play they have the option to draw another from the draw pile and then discard a tile from their hand. Play then moves to the next player.
    5. The game ends when players run out of playable tiles. At the end of the game, the player with the most points wins.
      Note: In some cases it will be impossible to complete a ring depending on the arrangement of tiles. Also, it may be helpful to use a token unique to each player, such as spare small change, to place in the center of each ring that a player completes to keep score.

      Sedis Rings Example Game

  • Merry-Go-Round

    Spinning & Winning

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: 45 to 60 minutes
    Objective: Rotate edge tiles to score points and remove tiles
    Difficulty Level:  ◦◦•◦◦

    Setup:

    Line all 60 tiles up, at random, into alternating rows of 7 and 8 tiles. Example:

    Play:

    1. Players move by rotating free tiles (tiles surrounded on four or less sides) to align pips with adjacent tiles. Gameplay moves in a clockwise direction. Choose a player to go first.
    2. Players must rotate tiles into a different position than the position the tile started in. Players may not rotate tiles back to their initial position.
    3. Players receive points by aligning the pips of the rotated tile with the pips of adjacent tiles. Each pip that aligns after rotation is worth one point.

    4.  After a tile is rotated, the player removes it from the board.
    5. Gameplay ends when the number of tiles on the board matches the number of players playing the game.
    6. The player with the most points wins!

     

  • Snake

    Weave Tiles Together

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 (max 6)
    Estimated Time: 5 to 10 minutes per round
    Objective: Have the least amount of tiles at the end of the game
    Difficulty Level: •◦◦◦◦

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. Each player takes ten tiles at random: five that make up their hand (you can look at these) and five that they place face down in front of them that make up their reserve hand (don’t look at these yet).
    3. Choose a player to go first. This player takes one tile from the remaining undistributed face down tiles and places it face up on the playing surface.

    Play

    1. Players take turns clockwise, starting to the left of the first player. Players must play tiles from their hand.
    2. Players may only play a tile if one two-pip side of that tile aligns with a two-pip side of a previously placed tile:

    3. After each tile is played, the player replaces the tile by taking one from their reserve hand. Play then passes to the next player.
    4. Turns continue in this fashion. If someone can’t play, they lose their turn and the next player goes.
    5. The game ends when a player runs out of tiles or the snake closes in on itself (a played tile comes in contact with two played tiles).

    Win

    When the game ends, everyone counts their remaining tiles. Whoever has the fewest wins. It is possible for the game to end in a tie. Players may choose to play another round to determine a winner.

    Note: Since this is a short game, it is frequently played a few times. To determine the overall winner when playing several games (rounds) in a row, add the total number of tiles in hand at the end of each round to make up one running score. The lowest score wins.

     

  • Bloom

    Build a Flower

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 4 (max 6)
    Estimated Time: Varies
    Objective: Create a bloom of Sedis tiles by matching pips
    Difficulty Level: ◦◦•◦◦

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. Each player takes seven tiles at random.

    Play

    1. Choose a player to go first. Players will take turns attempting to make a Bloom starting with the first player.
    2. A Bloom is a pattern of six tiles (called petals) surrounding a seventh central tile (called the pistil). Any tile can become the pistil or a petal.
    3. Players must match the pips on any side of a petal with the pips on one side of the central tile exactly.
    4. Sides of outer petals that touch must have at least one matching pip.

    5. If no one is able to complete a full seven-tile Bloom, the first player begins discarding tiles. The player discards the tile of their choice (usually one not already assigned to the pattern) and draws a new tile to play with. Players may arrange tiles on the playing surface to try and finish their Bloom.
    6. Play continues clockwise, with each player discarding a single tile and replacing it with a drawn tile in their hand. A player’s pattern may be changed by any player at any time, using the seven tiles in their hand.

    Win

    The winner is the first player to complete a full Bloom.

    Bloom Collaborative

    Trade Petals

    Objective: Create blooms with others
    Difficulty Level: ◦•◦◦◦

    Setup:

    Setup is the same as traditional Bloom.

    Play:

    Gameplay for Collaborative Bloom is the same as gameplay for traditional Bloom, but with one exception: Players may agree to trade tiles to give them a better chance at achieving the game’s objective. Trade may only happen between the player whose turn it is and another player. Players may also talk with the player whose turn it is to give or receive advice on building one or more of the blooms.

    Win:

    The winner is the first player to complete a full Bloom

    Bloom Advanced

    Bloom with Your Mind

    Objective: Create a Bloom without first arranging it on the playing surface
    Difficulty Level: ◦◦◦

    Setup: 

    Setup is the same as traditional Bloom.

    Play:

    Gameplay for Advanced Bloom is the same as gameplay for traditional Bloom with one key difference: Players may only look at the tiles in their hand and may not arrange them on the board prior to arranging their Bloom. This means players must arrange the Bloom in their heads prior to arranging it on the table, and may only arrange the Bloom on the table once they have the necessary tiles.

    Win:

    The winner is the first player to complete a full Bloom.

  • Spokes

    Race to the Center

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 4 (max 6)
    Estimated Time: 30 to 60 minutes
    Objective: Remove tiles from play to score the most points
    Difficulty Level:  ◦◦◦•◦

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. Each player draws five tiles face down and places them in a stack.
    3. Once all initial player tiles have been drawn, draw one tile and place it in the center of the playing table face down. The remaining tiles form a draw pile.
    4. Each player then places their tiles face up, one at a time, in a column with the primary side facing away from the center tile.

      Three Player Setup Example

       

    Play

    1. Choose a player to go first. Players take turns clockwise. Each player receives five “energy” to be used to move as many tiles as possible into a stack on the center, face down tile
    2. On a player’s turn, they may use their energy in any of the following ways:
      Move a tile or stack of tiles a number of spaces indicated by the pips of the top most tile along the spoke. Details on movement on next page. (Cost: Number of tiles in stack)
      Rotate a stack of tiles (Cost: 1 energy)
      Collapse tiles in a spoke (Cost: 1 energy)

    Movement using three energy

    Rotation using one energy

     

    Collapse of a spoke using one energy

    Movement
    Tiles may be moved forward or backward along a player’s spoke. The number of spaces a tile may be moved is determined by the position of the pip(s) on the side of the tile facing the direction a player would like to move.

    For example, if the center facing side of a tile has pips in the first, second, and third position, a player may move that tile and any tiles below it one, two, or three spaces as long as it does it not break any other rules.

    A tile may not be moved past the center, face down tile. Also, a tile may not be moved past the fifth space away from the center tile.

    The cost of movement is always the number of tiles in a moved stack. The number of spaces moved does not change the energy cost.

    A tile with the ability to move one, three, or three spaces forward and two spaces back

     

     

    3. Once a player has exhausted all of their energy or forfeited their unused energy, score the stack of face up tiles in the center as follows:
    1 tile: 1 point
    2 tiles: 3 points
    3+ tiles: 6 points + 3 points for each additional tile above 3 tiles

    4. Remove the scored face up tiles. Then, collapse remaining tiles toward the center so there are no spaces. Draw additional tiles and place them to fill out five spaces per column.

    5. Play until all tiles have been used. Player with the highest cumulative score wins!

    Spokes Short Game

    Setup:

    Same as standard Spokes.

    Play:

    Same as standard Spokes.

    Win:

    The first player to reach 30 points (or another predetermined number) wins!

  • Pyrrhic War

    Destroy the Battlefield

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: 30 to 60 minutes
    Objective: Move tiles around the board to conquer other the battlefield
    Difficulty Level: ◦◦

    Setup

    For 2-3 players, arrange 36 tiles at random, into a triple ring formation where 6 tiles make the inner ring, 12 tiles make the middle ring, and 18 tiles make the outer ring. For 4-6 players, arrange all 60 Sedis tiles at random, into a quadruple ring formation the same as or 2-3 players, but adding an additional 24 tile ring to the outside.

    Play

    1. Gameplay moves in a clockwise direction. Choose a player to go first.
    2. Players may move any accessible tile (a tile without another tile stacked directly on top of it) in any direction according to the location of pips on that tile as long as the tile does not land in a compromising position or outside of the battlefield (further explained in steps 5 and 6). For instance, if the side of a tile has pips in the 1st, 3rd, and 4th positions on the primary side, it can move either 1, 3, or 4 spaces in the direction that side is facing. If the side next to it has a pip in the 3rd position, the tile may move four spaces in that direction.
    3. Tiles may land in empty spaces, on the edge of the board, or stacked directly on top of other tiles. Tiles may be stacked as high as you like. Tiles are captured when the number of pips on a side of a moved tile outnumbers the number of pips on sides touching that tile after it has been moved. Captured tiles (tiles that have been outnumbered on sides by moved tiles) are removed from the board and added to the attacking player’s spoils. Raider tiles can only capture tiles on the same level that they land on. For instance, if a raider tile lands on the second layer (stacked on top of another tile) it can only capture the tiles it touches on that layer.
    4. The number of pips on each side of a moved tile must tie or outnumber the number of pips on all touching sides of that tile after it has been moved. Players may NOT move into a compromised position; that is, players may NOT move a tile into a position where the number of pips on the side of a tile is less than that of the number of pips on a touching side once the tile has been moved.

     

    5. Raider Tiles must be moved to a space where they touch at least one other tile. Tiles are allowed to be isolated once captured tiles have been removed. Isolated tiles remain in play as long as they can be captured or act as Raider Tiles. Players may NOT move a tile to a completely isolated space.

     

  • Blüf

    Sedis Betting

    Recommended Number of Players: 2 to 6 players
    Estimated Time: Varies
    Objective: Win the wager
    Difficulty Level:

    Setup

    1. Place all 60 tiles face down and shuffle them.
    2. Players must ante – placing an agreed-upon initial bet in order to play.
    3. Players who have anted draws five tiles into a hand. Player may look at their tiles but should not show them to rival players.

    Play

    1. Each player attempts to arrange their five tiles in such a way as to have the highest score or to make other players believe they have the highest score. Players may reorder or rotate tiles in their hand. Hands are scored by counting the number of matching pips between vertically stacked tiles.
    2. After each player has decided the order and orientation of their tiles, place them on the playing surface in a face up stack with only the top tile showing.

    3. Once all players have placed their full stack in front of them, betting begins. Starting with a designated starting player, each player in turn bets. Subsequent players have the option of calling the bet, raising the bet, or withdrawing from play.
    4. Once all players have called the highest bet or withdrawn, players enter the reveal phase of play. During this phase, all players remove the top tile from their stack of play, placing this tile next to the unrevealed tiles, in order.
    5. As each tile is removed from each player’s stack, betting is revisited, with each player declaring the number of points they have currently revealed before betting continues. At each step of the reveal phase of betting, players have the option of checking (if no raise has occurred), calling the current bet, raising the bet further, or withdrawing from play.

    Win

    If all players but one have withdrawn, the remaining player is the winner and receives the full pool of bets placed. If two or more players continue until the last reveal, the player with the highest total matching pip count wins. If two or more players have the same total matching pip count in the end, they split the pot evenly.

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